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Best Tesla for Commuting? Model 3, here’s why…

As the world’s first all-electric car, the Tesla is easy to fall in love with, but for many, it is the idea behind the Tesla that is more loveable. Many have eagerly opened their hearts, and their wallets, for the promise of a more sustainable future, but being an all-electric car, Tesla does have some limitations.

Since Tesla’s run by battery power, and must be charged after a certain number of miles, many people have asked, what is the best Tesla for commuting?

With the capability of getting up toor over400 miles on a single charge, the Tesla Model S makes an excellent choice for commuters. However, the long-range Model 3, with a range of 350 miles, might be a more affordable option.

Continue reading to learn more about each Tesla model available on the market today and which one might work best for your commute.

New Tesla cars on transport truck

What is Tesla?

Tesla the Car – Tesla was the first company to release a fully electric car and one of the first companies to mass-produce an affordable electric vehicle. Every single vehicle in the Tesla lineup is electric and powered by a large battery pack instead of gas. Their innovative technology, sleek design, and impressive speed make them one of the most universally loved EV vehicles on the market.

Currently (as of 2021) Tesla offers four vehicle models—the Model S, the Model X, the Model 3, and the Model Y. However, drivers may encounter other, previously sold, models as well.

2022 Model S

Launched in 2012, the Model S was the first electric vehicle to top monthly sales charts and was dubbed “Car of The Year” by Motor Trend in 2019. This content is owned by moc.sotuaytsur. This flagship vehicle has remained mostly unchanged since 2012 but received a refresh in 2021. Today, it is the highest performing sedan on the market and has the longest range of any electric vehicle currently manufactured.

Although this model has been offered in several types and trims, its lineup is currently quite simple, and users can choose between either the base Long-Range model or the Plaid model.

Long Range

PriceMSRP: $94,990 Prices start around $88,740 and the closing price depends on add-ons or chosen features.
Range – Charging TimeRange: 405 mi
Charge Times:
120V: 135hrs
NEMA 14-50: 18hrs
Wall Connector: 12hrs
Supercharger: 15mins

Plaid

PriceMSRP: $129,990 Prices start at $123,740 and the final price depends on add-ons and chosen features.
Range – Charge Time380 Miles Although charging times vary, the Model S Plaid is the fastest charging Tesla available. You can find some average charging times below.
120V: 120hrs
NEMA 14-50: 16hrs
Wall Connector: 10hrs
Supercharger: 15mins

Source: Energysage.com

The Model S Tesla is in the upper range of costs, comparable to a Mercedes, but unfortunately without the interior comfort. The Model S is certainly for the discerning executive commuter who cares about the world, and the range is acceptable for driving from suburbia to city each day without having to charge when you get there.

Model X

Introduced in 2016, the Tesla Model X was one of the world’s first electric SUVs, and with unmatched acceleration, the Model X was literally unbeatable. In 2021, this speedy SUV saw an upgrade that gave it a new 17-inch touchscreen, a new steering wheel design, and a new instrument panel. Even today, this SUV is one of the few EV SUVs on the market, giving it very few competitors.

Long Range

PriceMSRP: 104,990 Average: Starts at $104,990 but the price may vary depending on the add-ons and chosen features. For example, adding extra seating increases the price by $3,500 and self-driving capabilities will cost drivers an added $10,000.
Range – Charge Time348 miles Charge times vary depending on where you charge your vehicle and the amount of charge left in the battery. However, you can find an average list of charge times below.
120V: 180hrs
NEMA 14-50: 18hrs
Wall Connector: 12hrs
Supercharger: 15mins

Plaid

PriceMSRP: $119,990 Average: Starts at $119,990 but the final price depends on add-ons and other added features. For example, adding extra seating increases the price by $3,500 and self-driving capabilities will cost drivers an additional $10,000.
Range – Charging Time333 miles Charging time will vary depending on where you charge your vehicle and the depletion of the battery when it is charged. However, you can find a list of average charge times below.
120V: 180hrs
NEMA 14-50: 18hrs
Wall Connector: 12hrs
Supercharger: 15mins

Source: Energysage.com

The Model X Tesla is sold as an SUV. It certainly has a lot of interior space, with the third row of seats, however, for a commute to the city, the gull-wing doors are just not very practical. If you are moving people in and out of the vehicle, it’s going to be challenging to find a parking space that will accommodate the doors. If you are commuting on your own then you can appreciate the panoramic view available from hood to ceiling, but realistically on a commute, I’m not sure this is top of the agenda.

Model Y

The Model Y is Tesla’s next attempt at pleasing the SUV-loving public and one of its only competitors for its Model X. However, many have noted that the Model Y is not much different from the Model 3 aside from its SUV/Crossover look and feel.

Long Range

PriceMSRP: $41,990 – $58,990 Pricing starts at $53,940 and the final price depends on any add-ons or chosen features. For example, for an extra $1,000 buyers can add a tow hitch and for $10,000 drivers can add self-driving capabilities.
Range – Charging Time330 miles Charging time varies depending on where you charge your vehicle and the depletion of the battery. However, you can find an average list of charge times below.
120V: 109hrs
NEMA 14-50: 11hrs
Wall Connector: 8hrs
Supercharger: 15mins

Performance

PriceMSRP: $63,990 Pricing starts at $58,940 but the final price will depend on add-ons and chosen features. For example, drivers can add self-driving capabilities for an extra $10,000.
Range – Charging Time303 Miles Charging time varies depending on where you charge your vehicle and the depletion of the battery. However, you can find an average list of charge times below.
120V: 120hrs
NEMA 14-50: 11hrs
Wall Connector: 8hrs
Supercharger: 15mins

Source: Energysage.com

The Model Y Tesla is in the same realm as the Model 3, with fewer extras. It’s not as roomy as the X and although the extra third row is available to install it will cost you an added $3000, and to be honest I’m not sure it would accommodate adults due to the space confines.

It is in the lower regions of the costings and with a range of approximately 300 miles on a charge would definitely get you to your destination and home again if you live within the city limits or just beyond. If you are traveling further afield then you may need to check where you could obtain a boost.

Model 3

The Model 3 is typically considered Tesla’s entry-level sedan and is one of the more affordable Tesla options. However, do not let its smaller price tag fool you, this model still offers an impressive range and the same superior performance users have come to expect from Tesla.

Standard Range

PriceMSRP: $44,990 Price starts at $39,940 but the final price will depend on any add-ons or chosen features. For example, buyers can choose to add 19-inch sport wheels for an extra $1,500.
Range – Charging Times272 Miles Although charging times will depend on where you charge your vehicle and the battery depletion, you can find a list of average charge times below.
120V: 87hrs
NEMA 14-50: 9hrs
Wall Connector: 9hrs
Supercharger: 15mins

Long Range AWD

PriceMSRP: $50,990 Pricing starts at $45,940 but the final price will depend on add-ons and extra features. For example, drivers can choose to add self-driving capabilities for $10,000 more.
Range – Charging Time358 Miles Although charging times will depend on where you charge your vehicle and the battery depletion, you can find a list of average charge times below.
120V: 118hrs
NEMA 14-50: 12hrs
Wall Connector: 8hrs
Supercharger: 15mins

Performance

PriceMSRP: $58,990 Pricing starts at $53,940 but the final price depends on any add-ons or extra features. For example, drivers can add self-driving capabilities for only $10,000 more.
Range – Charging Time315 Miles Although charging times will depend on where you charge your vehicle and the battery depletion, you can find a list of average charge times below.
120V: 118hrs
NEMA 14-50: 12hrs
Wall Connector: 8hrs
Supercharger: 15mins

Source: Energysage.com

The Model 3 Tesla became the No. 1 best-selling American-made car in 2021, the first EV to claim this title. This is a phenomenal achievement. The 3 has all the gadgets and tech and is more affordable for the average commuter. It also has the Smart Summon option if you return to your car and find someone has parked too close to you, it will drive itself out. Again the range is enough for an average commute each day, with an overnight charge with a wall connector restoring it to full overnight.

Which Is the Best Tesla for Commuting?

Different drivers look for different things in a vehicle, but for people who commute, the most important thing is how far they can go on a charge. It would not make much sense for someone who drives over 400 miles a day to purchase a car that can only go 276 miles on a single charge.

Additionally, drivers will need to make sure they have enough time in between commutes to charge their vehicle and if they do not have charging availability where they work, they may need to make the full round trip on one charge.

For these reasons, it seems as though the best Tesla for commuting would be the ones that have the longest range and fastest charging times, however, these are in the upper price range of new vehicles.

The Model S, with its long-range, would suit most commuters but the price may not. It is also the fastest charging Tesla, which makes it more convenient if a driver were stuck having to charge their vehicle halfway through their commute. However, price is the problem and with a 6 figure price tag, it may not be the choice of many.

All things considered, I’d pick the long-range Model 3, I’d add the self-driving extras and I’d spring for AWD if I lived in the northern states. Whichever you choose, enjoy!

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